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September 2020 the warmest on record

Temperatures were 0.05C hotter last month than September 2019, which in turn also set the highest record compared to the year before. 

And it’s not just in the UK… By Eleanor Sly 

How do we know this? 

The European Union’s Earth Observation Programme, Copernicus, monitors global temperatures and extreme weather events and has recorded some above-average findings for September 2020. 

It was 0.05C warmer than September 2019, which had also set the previous record high. Scientists are keen to stress that this increase in temperature doesn’t mean that next September will necessarily be hotter than the one just passed, as fluctuations are possible. 

They do warn however, that this increase is a clear indication of temperatures being driven up by human emissions.

What’s happening worldwide? 

The UK wasn’t alone in its above-average temperatures. Copernicus has warned that the temperatures in the Siberian Arctic were way above average and Arctic sea ice is at its second lowest since satellite records began. 

This year has brought devastating wildfires in America and Australia and the hottest day on record (54.4C) in Death Valley. 

And it’s not just a rise in temperature we have to worry about. Overall, global warming is fuelling more extreme weather. This has included flooding in France and Italy… meanwhile, Reading has just endured its wettest ever 48 hours.

Boris Johnson and Sir David Attenborough

Scientists are warning that these more extreme events could happen more frequently with just one degree of warming. 

If current estimates are anything to go by, the world is heading for a three degree increase if we don’t do anything to stop it. 

This news comes as Boris Johnson announced plans to power all UK homes by wind farms by 2030. 

This would be the first stage of a 10-point plan for a “green industrial revolution” with Number 10 striving to “accelerate our progress towards net zero emissions by 2050.” 

Sir David Attenborough has also spoken out with climate concerns this week, urging viewers of his latest series, A Life on Our Planet, that action needs to be taken.